Book Review Challenge Series – The Importance Of Book Reviews By Terry Tyler

Rosie Amber

Day 3

Today our guest is fabulous author Terry Tyler. I’ve challenged Terry to talk about the importance of book reviews as an author. Plus we’ll look at Goodreads and should you write a Bad Book Review?

TerryTwit2

Over to you Terry.

1)      How important are book reviews for an author?

 Hugely, massively! The more the better. Doesn’t even matter if some aren’t that complimentary; they show potential readers that the book has provoked interest sufficient for people to want to write about it. It doesn’t matter if some of the reviews are only a couple of lines long, either.

 2) What are the top sites for book reviews?

I’m sorry, I don’t know! I only know about the few on which I’ve appeared regularly, which, apart from yours, are A Woman’s Wisdom, Once Upon A Book Blog, Jera’s Jamboree, Me My Books and I, Kerry’s Reviews Blog, A Lover Of…

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Hand of God

Brian Bilston's Poetry Laboetry

We cried blue murder at the time.
It was a crime against humanity,
Not an act of spontaneity
From the digits of a deity.

Still, the next week, each lunchtime,
We were all doing it.
Any aerial challenge became
An opportunity for divine intervention,
With an asphalt Ascension
Into a playground pantheon
Of class-war champions
Beckoning for anyone who could
Pull off a palm of providence
With confidence.

And although our clumsy
Sleights of hand were always exposed,
Like a bungled party trick,
It didn’t stop us from trying
To create artistry out of artifice.

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A Game of Tongues: Why George R. R. Martin is a Linguist After All

Word Jazz

George R. R. Martin. Photograph by Gage Skidmore (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AGeorge_R._R._Martin_(9350730880).jpg) George R. R. Martin. Photo by Gage Skidmore: (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/01/George_R._R._Martin_%289350730880%29.jpg)

One of the great achievements of any work of fantasy or science fiction is the creation of an entirely new world – think of the Star Wars universe or Lord of the Rings’ Middle-Earth. Although many new worlds have been created by fantasy authors over the years, only a few can match the complex, beguiling and deadly world of George R. R. Martin’s Game of Thrones.

Of course, no new world would be complete without its own language or languages. Martin is quick to point out that he is no linguist himself. When creating the lands of Westeros and Essos, and all its linguistic complexities, Martin couldn’t rely on classical training as a philologist as J. R. R. Tolkien could. So, although he invented a few words and phrases of Dothraki for the original Game of Thrones novel…

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Pele and Bobby Moore

Iconic Photos

Iconic Photos looks back on one of the greatest moments of soccer and of sportsmanship. 

England and Brazil came into the 1970 world cup in Mexico with high hopes. England were the reigning champions; Brazil, the winners of 1958 and 1962, lost embarrassingly and were kicked out at the group stage in 1966. Now they were back, with a team of “five number 10s” – Pele, Jairzinho, Rivelino, Gerson and Tostao.

Many people predicted that the groupmatch between England and Brazil would be the dress rehearsal for the eventual inevitable final. It wasn’t, but the match in did not disappoint. Even today, even those who do not know much about football and its history (like your writer) would recognize the iconic moments from this match: Alan Ball’s and Jeff Astle’s misses, Bobby Moore’s tackle on Pele and, of course, Gordon Banks’s remarkable save from Pele’s header, which had been repeatedly called the best save…

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Pushing Through Writing Failure with the Help of a Lost Horse by Heather Mackey

Nerdy Book Club

Stories thrive on reversals. You get your heart’s desire, only it turns out to be the worst thing that could happen to you. Or, it looks like all is lost, but then somehow you save the day.

One of my favorite examples of the narrative power of reversal is found in a very simple story from China called “The Lost Horse.” I encountered it through storyteller Joel ben Izzy, who wrote a fantastic book called The Beggar King and the Secret of Happiness. In “The Lost Horse,” a wise man goes through a series of reversals of fortune. Whether the change is favorable or not, his response is always the same: What seems like a blessing could be a curse. What seems like a curse could be a blessing.

I remember this story so well because—after a great deal of misery and self-flagellation—I recognize it as the story of my…

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There might not be a place for you in the church: And that’s a good thing

all our lemmony things

If you know me at all–whether it’s just through my blog or whether you’re one of my co-workers or even my best friend back in Idaho–you know how I feel about fitting in. Scratch that. I simply don’t fit in. And chances are, neither do you. If you’ve read some of my past blogs, you know very well that I’m an advocate for the black sheep. And often times, the black sheep can even wear the white wool. Believe me.

Over the course of keeping this blog I’ve had the honor of meeting so many kinds of people. People who homeschool their children and can peaches on Sunday. People who struggle with mental illness. People who have had everyone in their family die and who literally live alone and have no one to call. People who were raised in Utah and long to break out. People who run businesses and people…

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MIA at E3: “Assassin’s Creed: Unity” and the Search For Our Female Characters

The Daily Geekette

Ubisoft's new Assassin's Creed game features co-op and some sexism on the sideUbisoft’s new Assassin’s Creed game features co-op and some sexism on the side

It’s dawn. A hawk glides past the inspiring edifice of Notre Dame and over restless crowds of revolutionaries. Four figures emerge from the smoke of gunfire. They have three things in common: they’re all Assassins, they’re all fighting on the side of “liberté, égalité, and fraternité”, and they’re all male. In Assassin’s Creed: Unity at least, the ‘brotherhood’ part of the Revolution’s maxim apparently counts more than calls for ‘liberty’ and ‘equality’. The upcoming title in Ubisoft’s ever-popular franchise comes with a new option for four-player co-op, but the four characters are really just one; all consist of variations on the protagonist Arno Dorian.  A common question thus returns to the conversation: when introducing an option for players to customise their protagonist, why was a female not available for that choice?

“It was really a lot of…

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